Restricted by Generosity: Greenwood’s Battle Against Local Philanthropy’s Agenda

by Staff Writer Lindsay Myers “This is the compromise, the truce, distilled: Leave us alone in the competitive marketplace, and we will tend to you after the winnings are won. The money will be spent more wisely on you than it would be by you. You will have your chance to enjoy our wealth, inContinue reading “Restricted by Generosity: Greenwood’s Battle Against Local Philanthropy’s Agenda”

The Victory of Greenwood: B. C. Franklin

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno B.C. Franklin’s autobiography, “My Life and an Era,” takes its readers back in time to a period of Oklahoma’s history when Black families enjoyed an abundance of prosperity, peace and freedom. His parents were Choctaw and Chickasaw and were both highly respected in the Indian Territory. Growing up, B.C. learnedContinue reading “The Victory of Greenwood: B. C. Franklin”

Tulsa Housing Authority Extends Deadline for Emergency Rental Assistance Program

by Staff Writer Torrel Miles The global pandemic has decimated the mirage of normalcy we have become accustomed to. Businesses have floundered and careers have been cut short. Social interaction has become taboo. Sneezing and coughing have become a public offense punishable by scowls and open hostility. Coupled with assaults on human rights, impending economicContinue reading “Tulsa Housing Authority Extends Deadline for Emergency Rental Assistance Program”

The Victory of Greenwood: Horace “Peg Leg” Taylor

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno It’s no exaggeration to say that no one in Greenwood’s history is more shrouded in myth and legend than Horace “Peg Leg” Taylor. He is said to have been a World War I veteran who died while single-handedly defending Standpipe Hill armed with a machine gun. He did defend GreenwoodContinue reading “The Victory of Greenwood: Horace “Peg Leg” Taylor”

The Victory of Greenwood: Simon Berry

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno Greenwood produced many great entrepreneurs but perhaps none has left such a lasting legacy on Tulsa as Simon Berry. Social entrepreneurship is a current buzz word in the business community but this was the type of business that Berry conducted throughout his life. Berry’s businesses met the needs of theContinue reading “The Victory of Greenwood: Simon Berry”

Myth of a Resilient Tulsa: The Problem with the Equality Indicators

by Staff Writer Torrel Miles Early February of this year, when questioned by a reporter from the Tulsa World on whether  the Equality Indicators were an “accurate representation of police use-of-force incidents within the department,” Major Wendell Franklin, Tulsa’s first Black police chief, responded: “I don’t want to get into whether or not the dataContinue reading “Myth of a Resilient Tulsa: The Problem with the Equality Indicators”

When Economic Development Only Benefits Some: Tulsa’s Struggle with Inequitable Economic Opportunity

by Staff Writer Lindsay Myers We often celebrate when large businesses and corporations are willing to establish roots in Tulsa. Of course, the benefits should not be overlooked because more business generates revenue for our local economy and creates job opportunities. Such an opportunity is why our city fought hard for an Amazon fulfillment centerContinue reading “When Economic Development Only Benefits Some: Tulsa’s Struggle with Inequitable Economic Opportunity”

What happens when the data is inconvenient? Tulsa’s struggle with meaningful implementation

by Staff Writer Lindsay Myers Under Mayor Dewey Bartlett, Tulsa adopted the Open and Accessible Data Resolution in 2013. This set the stage to make data transparency a city-wide priority. Three years later, the citizens of Tulsa were promised four years of policy decisions based on data and facts. To make this happen, city officialsContinue reading “What happens when the data is inconvenient? Tulsa’s struggle with meaningful implementation”

Tulsa Has a Traffic Problem: How Leadership has Misled the Community into Investing in Inequitable Infrastructure

by Contributing Writer Kolby Webster “Good streets are more than a convenience – they are an economic necessity,” reads Bynum’s re-election site. However, in a city as sprawled as Tulsa, the attitude of entitlement to our vast and expensive street network and the hubris to expand it creates a false sense of due diligence andContinue reading “Tulsa Has a Traffic Problem: How Leadership has Misled the Community into Investing in Inequitable Infrastructure”

The Path Forward: Tulsa Star’s Guide to Tulsa’s Mayoral Candidates

by Executive Editor Timantha Norman Tulsa has been thrust into the national spotlight in recent years on the heels of the 100-year anniversary of the worst instance of racial terror to ever take place on American soil during one of the most unique times in our nation’s contemporary history. With this as the backdrop, theContinue reading “The Path Forward: Tulsa Star’s Guide to Tulsa’s Mayoral Candidates”

The Victory of Greenwood: J. B. Stradford

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno On the morning of Tuesday, December 1st, 1908, J.B. Stradford and his wife Augusta boarded a train from Kansas on the Katy line to Tulsa, Oklahoma. They refused to ride in the furthest train car, reserved for Black passengers, behind the cars that carried animals. The conductor wired the trainContinue reading “The Victory of Greenwood: J. B. Stradford”

The Victory of Greenwood: Mabel B. Little

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno On a warm summer Tuesday evening on June 1st, 1971, dozens of parishioners and community members gathered at Mt. Zion Baptist Church to hear Mabel Little speak. W.D. Williams, son of John and Loula Williams and history teacher at Booker T. Washington High School, hosted the event and introduced Ms.Continue reading “The Victory of Greenwood: Mabel B. Little”

Unappreciated and Underpaid: The Support Staff of TPS

by Staff Writer Britni Sharde “There appears to be a disconnect between the people that run Tulsa’s education system and the people that work for them,” said community advocate Kelsey Royce. According to several sources, support staff have experienced unfair working conditions while being unappreciated and underpaid for years. In April of 2018, teachers inContinue reading “Unappreciated and Underpaid: The Support Staff of TPS”

The 2020 Census: The Necessity of Being Counted

by Managing Editor Raynell Joseph Since 1790, the U.S. government has counted its population every 10 years through what’s known as the Census. It counts the population in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and five U.S. territories. The Decennial Census is said to be the most inclusive activity in our country and isContinue reading “The 2020 Census: The Necessity of Being Counted”

The Continual Erasure of Greenwood

by Staff Writer Lindsay Myers By now, most Tulsans are familiar with the history of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, when miles of Black-owned businesses and homes were destroyed. Black residents have worked tirelessly for nearly a century to recover the history of Black Wall Street and their labor is finally being acknowledged. Yet, asContinue reading “The Continual Erasure of Greenwood”

The Victory of Greenwood: Dr. A. C. Jackson

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno Every Tulsa historian would agree that among the most tragic of the deaths which occurred during the Race Massacre of 1921 was that of Dr. A.C. Jackson. The esteemed physician and surgeon was well-respected not only in Greenwood but across medical circles throughout the country. However, relatively little is knownContinue reading “The Victory of Greenwood: Dr. A. C. Jackson”

History repeating itself: Black contractors fight for equity and inclusion in city contracts

by Managing Editor Raynell Joseph Small businesses contribute to the overall economic health of a community. Black Tulsans have a model in Greenwood, where African-Americans built wealth, re-invested it into the community, and lent money to aspiring entrepreneurs. When black-owned small businesses are supported, the racial wealth gap decreases, jobs are created, families are providedContinue reading “History repeating itself: Black contractors fight for equity and inclusion in city contracts”

The Victory of Greenwood: John and Loula Williams

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno Tulsa historian Scott Ellsworth’s Death in a Promised Land opens with the story of a young Bill Williams asking his father why they relocated from Mississippi to Oklahoma. “Well,” his father answered, “I came out to the Promised Land.” For black freedmen and young black men and women moving outContinue reading “The Victory of Greenwood: John and Loula Williams”

Envision Comanche: Reimagining Public Housing in North Tulsa

by Managing Editor Raynell Joseph In 2017, Aaron Darden joined the Tulsa Housing Authority (THA) as their new CEO. After the change in leadership, the organization asked themselves this question: “How do we make sure we’re doing the best for our families?” The organization came to the conclusion that the current state of public housingContinue reading “Envision Comanche: Reimagining Public Housing in North Tulsa”

The Victory of Greenwood: O.W. Gurley

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno During his life, O.W. Gurley was an educator, a church founder, a presidential appointee, a general store owner, a hotel proprietor, a landlord, a deputy police officer, and most famously, the founder of the Greenwood District in Tulsa, OK. His vision of a prosperous black community would be destroyed twiceContinue reading “The Victory of Greenwood: O.W. Gurley”