The Victory of Greenwood: O.W. Gurley

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno During his life, O.W. Gurley was an educator, a church founder, a presidential appointee, a general store owner, a hotel proprietor, a landlord, a deputy police officer, and most famously, the founder of the Greenwood District in Tulsa, OK. His vision of a prosperous black community would be destroyed twiceContinue reading “The Victory of Greenwood: O.W. Gurley”

George Kaiser’s Social Impact Philanthropy: How a Billionaire Transformed North Tulsa’s Misery into a Cash Cow

by Contributing Writer Julianne M. Romanello, Ph.D. In the elite circles of big philanthropy, Tulsa, Oklahoma has earned quite a reputation. Tulsa received the Readers’ Choice Award for “Best City for Philanthropy” in a 2018 poll conducted by The Chronicle of Philanthropy. This was not the first time Tulsa received national attention for its generosity.Continue reading “George Kaiser’s Social Impact Philanthropy: How a Billionaire Transformed North Tulsa’s Misery into a Cash Cow”

Reparations: A Case for Financial Compensation for Black Americans

by Staff Writer Britni Sharde Reparations are, by definition, the act of putting into proper condition or repairing with either services or monetary support for destruction and/or loss inflicted upon a community of people or nation. Discussions concerning reparations have often disregarded policy or legislation and misunderstood systemic trauma, such as slavery, black codes, JimContinue reading “Reparations: A Case for Financial Compensation for Black Americans”

The Victory of Greenwood: A. J. Smitherman

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno A.J. Smitherman is best known for being the founder of The Tulsa Star—Tulsa’s first black newspaper and the first black daily newspaper in the nation, according to his obituary in the Buffalo Evening News. However, there is much more to celebrate about Smitherman’s life and work. Smitherman was an accomplishedContinue reading “The Victory of Greenwood: A. J. Smitherman”

Pushed Out: How Public-Private Partnerships Work to Deter Black Wealth Acquisition (Part 2 of 3)

by Contributing Writer Mana Tahaie In the first part of this series, we looked at the historical policies that created an economic system hostile to Black wealth creation. In this article, we will explore how discriminatory housing and development policies paved the way for gentrification in the Greenwood and Near North neighborhoods.  Gentrification According toContinue reading “Pushed Out: How Public-Private Partnerships Work to Deter Black Wealth Acquisition (Part 2 of 3)”

A National Travesty: A Comprehensive Summary of the 2001 Commission Report on the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

by Staff Writer Britni Sharde Editor’s Note: The term “race riot” is used several times throughout this text when referring to the official name of the report. We at the Tulsa Star fully understand that the tragic events that took place May 31st- June 1st of 1921 were indeed a massacre, not a riot. TheContinue reading “A National Travesty: A Comprehensive Summary of the 2001 Commission Report on the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre”

Pinkwashing and the Environmental Injustice of the Beauty Industry

by Contributing Writer Nancy Moran RN, MS Each October during National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, everything from diamond-encrusted ribbons, sports uniforms, to beauty product packaging are awash in pink. Yet, before there was a pink ribbon, there were peach-colored ones handmade in 1992 by Charlotte Haley, whose granddaughter, sister, and mother had all battled breastContinue reading “Pinkwashing and the Environmental Injustice of the Beauty Industry”

An Ill Wind Blowing: Exploring Environmental Justice Issues Affecting North Tulsa

by Contributing Writer Nancy Moran MS, RN In 1971, Marvin Gaye expressed melancholy and loss concerning the damage inflicted on the planet by humans in his #1 R&B hit,  “Mercy, Mercy Me (The Ecology).”  At that time, there wasn’t yet a psychological term to describe his feelings. Today, The American Psychological Association (APA) might sayContinue reading “An Ill Wind Blowing: Exploring Environmental Justice Issues Affecting North Tulsa”

They Don’t Feel The Way We Do: Racial Bias in Maternal Health

by Executive Editor Timantha Norman An absent OBGYN, an unknown, apathetic stand-in, an epidural, a medically unwarranted Cesarean section procedure, and unnecessary physical complications during the recovery process made what should have been the most joyous event of my life one of the most traumatic. Even my first experience with breastfeeding with my newborn sonContinue reading “They Don’t Feel The Way We Do: Racial Bias in Maternal Health”

Making the OIM Matter: Why We Need To Go Back To The Drawing Board

by Contributing Writer Jaden Janak In February of this year, Mayor G.T. Bynum announced plans to create an Office of the Independent Monitor (more information about the proposed OIM ordinance can be found here) using the model currently present in Denver. This announcement came on the heels of 77 recommendations given by the Tulsa CommissionContinue reading “Making the OIM Matter: Why We Need To Go Back To The Drawing Board”

Are all cops the same? A black female officer’s perspective

by Staff Writer Britni Sharde We’ve heard the saying “Not all cops are the same!” Some of us have had respectable experiences, like being pulled over and only being given a warning or a ticket. But there are others whose experiences have triggered generational trauma. They have met their demise with a single police encounter.Continue reading “Are all cops the same? A black female officer’s perspective”

Consolidation frustration continues: A community member’s concerns around the Monroe reconfiguration

by Contributing Writer Darryl F. Bright Attached [below] is a Coalition presentation that I made to TPS Board of Education July 15, 2019 regarding Monroe. The document attached below was the basis for my presentation. It would have been impossible to deliver the document in 5 minutes. The attached was delivered to Dr. Gist andContinue reading “Consolidation frustration continues: A community member’s concerns around the Monroe reconfiguration”

Having the Tough Conversations: Racial Bias and Use of Force

by Contributing Writer Jaden Janak Wednesday’s special panel discussion on the use of force disparities in our city proved to be enlightening. Joining the esteemed panel of guests was Stanford Professor and MacArthur Genius Award winner Dr. Jennifer L. Eberhardt. Unlike previous comment sessions and special meetings, this meeting stayed (with a few notable exceptions)Continue reading “Having the Tough Conversations: Racial Bias and Use of Force”

The case for greater police accountability: The story of Chief Egunwale Amusan

by Staff Writer Deon Griggs The year was 1996 and the city of Tulsa, OK had just agreed to allow a KKK rally to take place downtown. Groups of predominantly black peaceful protesters displayed their disapproval while a patrol of police officers on horseback were sent to disperse the crowd. During the commotion of policeContinue reading “The case for greater police accountability: The story of Chief Egunwale Amusan”

Extractions, exploitation, destruction: How state-sanctioned disenfranchisement stunted Black wealth acquisition (Part 1 of 3)

by Contributing Writer Mana Tahaie Earlier this year, Tulsa Development Authority (TDA) once again came under scrutiny by Tulsans concerned about the displacement of Black North Tulsa residents. In March, City Councilor Vanessa Hall Harper warned residents of District 1 that a proposed amendment of the Greenwood/Unity Heritage Neighborhoods sector plan subjected approximately 2,000 addressesContinue reading “Extractions, exploitation, destruction: How state-sanctioned disenfranchisement stunted Black wealth acquisition (Part 1 of 3)”

The Importance of Community Voice in Community Development

by Senior Writer Becca Lais “At least it’s something.” This is a statement that North Tulsa community members are tired of hearing, much less accepting. Kandy Whitley-White shared this sentiment as she spoke about the Unity Heritage Plan created and amended by the Tulsa Development Authority (TDA). She is one of several concerned community membersContinue reading “The Importance of Community Voice in Community Development”

Consolidation frustration: Changes to McLain feeder pattern schools cause concern in the community

by Staff Writer Bianca Lowe Last fall, a group of community members, The North Tulsa Community Education Task Force (NTCETF), came together to confront the issues that have been plaguing McLain 7th Grade Academy.  The Task Force was formed in response to the community voicing concerns that McLain 7th Grade Academy would be closed becauseContinue reading “Consolidation frustration: Changes to McLain feeder pattern schools cause concern in the community”

Race massacre commission’s lack of transparency and inclusion causes concern in community

by Staff Writer Deon Griggs In July of 2016, Senator Kevin Matthews announced the Tulsa Race Massacre Commission’s proposal. This commission’s primary goal was to educate the public at large about the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921, as well as the impact it had on the state and the nation. The commission also wished toContinue reading “Race massacre commission’s lack of transparency and inclusion causes concern in community”

Who are the gatekeepers for the future of the historic Greenwood buildings?

by Multimedia Specialist Taylor Finley As the 100th year anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre approaches, the future development of the last two buildings on historic Greenwood have become a growing topic of conversation. This is especially true for many North Tulsans who feel directly impacted by its future. The success of the Greenwood buildingsContinue reading “Who are the gatekeepers for the future of the historic Greenwood buildings?”