The Continual Erasure of Greenwood

by Staff Writer Lindsay Myers By now, most Tulsans are familiar with the history of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, when miles of Black-owned businesses and homes were destroyed. Black residents have worked tirelessly for nearly a century to recover the history of Black Wall Street and their labor is finally being acknowledged. Yet, asContinue reading “The Continual Erasure of Greenwood”

History repeating itself: Black contractors fight for equity and inclusion in city contracts

by Managing Editor Raynell Joseph Small businesses contribute to the overall economic health of a community. Black Tulsans have a model in Greenwood, where African-Americans built wealth, re-invested it into the community, and lent money to aspiring entrepreneurs. When black-owned small businesses are supported, the racial wealth gap decreases, jobs are created, families are providedContinue reading “History repeating itself: Black contractors fight for equity and inclusion in city contracts”

Is This The Best This City Can Do? The City’s Responsibility To Ensure True Justice for All

by Senior Writer Britni Sharde “We don’t need a show. We need a police chief that will take servicing our community seriously,” a demand rightly expressed by North Tulsa native and executive editor of the Tulsa Star, Timantha Norman. Mayor GT Bynum has an opportunity to remove himself from his comfort zone of political expediencyContinue reading “Is This The Best This City Can Do? The City’s Responsibility To Ensure True Justice for All”

A National Travesty: A Comprehensive Summary of the 2001 Commission Report on the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

by Senior Writer Britni Sharde Editor’s Note: The term “race riot” is used several times throughout this text when referring to the official name of the report. We at the Tulsa Star fully understand that the tragic events that took place May 31st- June 1st of 1921 were indeed a massacre, not a riot. TheContinue reading “A National Travesty: A Comprehensive Summary of the 2001 Commission Report on the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre”

How do we truly see our children? Racial bias and its role in juvenile justice

by Contributing Writer Tyrance Billingsley II Are all children created equal in Tulsa, Oklahoma? Or rather, do the systems we have built and schemas we have constructed about our children reflect that? A section of the recent City of Tulsa Equality Indicators report showed a large disparity in youth arrests between minority and white children.Continue reading “How do we truly see our children? Racial bias and its role in juvenile justice”

Having the Tough Conversations: Racial Bias and Use of Force

by Contributing Writer Jaden Janak Wednesday’s special panel discussion on the use of force disparities in our city proved to be enlightening. Joining the esteemed panel of guests was Stanford Professor and MacArthur Genius Award winner Dr. Jennifer L. Eberhardt. Unlike previous comment sessions and special meetings, this meeting stayed (with a few notable exceptions)Continue reading “Having the Tough Conversations: Racial Bias and Use of Force”

Who’s going to police the police? Establishing an OIM is crucial to carrying out meaningful justice in our city

by Executive Editor Timantha Norman It seems as if the vast majority of black folks who claim roots in North Tulsa have had some sort of negative experience of one sort or another with the city’s main law enforcement entity. Some of us have been able to muster up the courage to stand in ourContinue reading “Who’s going to police the police? Establishing an OIM is crucial to carrying out meaningful justice in our city”