Victory of Greenwood: S.M. & Eunice Jackson

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno Often mentioned alongside John and Loula Williams and E.L. and Jeanne Goodwin as one of the greatest power couples of Greenwood, S.M. and Eunice Jackson were only married for five years. Yet, both… Read More

Victory of Greenwood: Dr. Olivia Hooker

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno In September 2018, the nonprofit organization StoryCorps recorded Dr. Olivia Hooker’s recollections about being the first Black woman admitted to the U.S. Coast Guard in 1945. She spoke about her worries as well… Read More

A Gaslit Century: The Journey Towards Justice for Greenwood

by Staff Writer Kolby Webster “Plaintiffs, Greenwood and North Tulsa residents and their descendants have experienced and continue to experience insecurity in their lives and property and their sense of comfort, health, and safety has been destroyed” is… Read More

white protest participant wearing "reckoning" sign

White Allyship: The Magic Of Missing The Point

by Contributing Writer Josh Linton It was the last day of May 2020. It was muggy and not what you’d call traditional Oklahoma summer heat. However, the inside of my mask had already started to display the salty… Read More

The Victory of Greenwood: E. L. and Jeanne Goodwin

by Contributing Writers Carlos Moreno and David Goodwin Eleven-year-old Edwin Lawrence Goodwin arrived in Greenwood in 1914 with his sisters Anna and Lucille, brother James Jr., and parents James Henri and Carlie Greer Goodwin. The family had come… Read More

Restricted by Generosity: Greenwood’s Battle Against Local Philanthropy’s Agenda

by Staff Writer Lindsay Myers “This is the compromise, the truce, distilled: Leave us alone in the competitive marketplace, and we will tend to you after the winnings are won. The money will be spent more wisely on… Read More

The Victory of Greenwood: B. C. Franklin

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno B.C. Franklin’s autobiography, “My Life and an Era,” takes its readers back in time to a period of Oklahoma’s history when Black families enjoyed an abundance of prosperity, peace and freedom. His parents… Read More

When Economic Development Only Benefits Some: Tulsa’s Struggle with Inequitable Economic Opportunity

by Staff Writer Lindsay Myers We often celebrate when large businesses and corporations are willing to establish roots in Tulsa. Of course, the benefits should not be overlooked because more business generates revenue for our local economy and… Read More

The Victory of Greenwood: Mabel B. Little

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno On a warm summer Tuesday evening on June 1st, 1971, dozens of parishioners and community members gathered at Mt. Zion Baptist Church to hear Mabel Little speak. W.D. Williams, son of John and… Read More

The Continual Erasure of Greenwood

by Staff Writer Lindsay Myers By now, most Tulsans are familiar with the history of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, when miles of Black-owned businesses and homes were destroyed. Black residents have worked tirelessly for nearly a century… Read More

The Victory of Greenwood: O.W. Gurley

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno During his life, O.W. Gurley was an educator, a church founder, a presidential appointee, a general store owner, a hotel proprietor, a landlord, a deputy police officer, and most famously, the founder of… Read More

Creating Your Own Lane

Black Entrepreneurship and its Role in the Future of Greenwood by Executive Editor Timantha Norman Black self-sufficiency in the form of entrepreneurship, a sound economic infrastructure, and unyielding courage led to the creation of the most prolific black… Read More

The Victory of Greenwood: A. J. Smitherman

by Contributing Writer Carlos Moreno A.J. Smitherman is best known for being the founder of The Tulsa Star—Tulsa’s first black newspaper and the first black daily newspaper in the nation, according to his obituary in the Buffalo Evening… Read More

Pushed Out: How Public-Private Partnerships Work to Deter Black Wealth Acquisition (Part 2 of 3)

by Contributing Writer Mana Tahaie In the first part of this series, we looked at the historical policies that created an economic system hostile to Black wealth creation. In this article, we will explore how discriminatory housing and… Read More

Extractions, exploitation, destruction: How state-sanctioned disenfranchisement stunted Black wealth acquisition (Part 1 of 3)

by Contributing Writer Mana Tahaie Earlier this year, Tulsa Development Authority (TDA) once again came under scrutiny by Tulsans concerned about the displacement of Black North Tulsa residents. In March, City Councilor Vanessa Hall Harper warned residents of… Read More

Race massacre commission’s lack of transparency and inclusion causes concern in community

by Staff Writer Deon Griggs In July of 2016, Senator Kevin Matthews announced the Tulsa Race Massacre Commission’s proposal. This commission’s primary goal was to educate the public at large about the Tulsa Race Massacre of 1921, as… Read More

Who are the gatekeepers for the future of the historic Greenwood buildings?

by Multimedia Specialist Taylor Finley As the 100th year anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre approaches, the future development of the last two buildings on historic Greenwood have become a growing topic of conversation. This is especially true… Read More