Reflections on Four Months of “Debate” on Race, Policing, and the Value of Black Lives

by Contributing Writer Mana Tahaie Author’s Note: These are my remarks from September 25th’s Tulsa City Council special meeting on racial and gender disparities in adult arrests. Opening Statement Good evening Councilors, Mayor Bynum, Chief Jordan, Ms. Doring, and Mr. O’Mellia. Before I begin, I want to acknowledge that we are on occupied land belongingContinue reading “Reflections on Four Months of “Debate” on Race, Policing, and the Value of Black Lives”

They Don’t Feel The Way We Do: Racial Bias in Maternal Health

by Executive Editor Timantha Norman An absent OBGYN, an unknown, apathetic stand-in, an epidural, a medically unwarranted Cesarean section procedure, and unnecessary physical complications during the recovery process made what should have been the most joyous event of my life one of the most traumatic. Even my first experience with breastfeeding with my newborn sonContinue reading “They Don’t Feel The Way We Do: Racial Bias in Maternal Health”

How do we truly see our children? Racial bias and its role in juvenile justice

by Contributing Writer Tyrance Billingsley II Are all children created equal in Tulsa, Oklahoma? Or rather, do the systems we have built and schemas we have constructed about our children reflect that? A section of the recent City of Tulsa Equality Indicators report showed a large disparity in youth arrests between minority and white children.Continue reading “How do we truly see our children? Racial bias and its role in juvenile justice”

Having the Tough Conversations: Racial Bias and Use of Force

by Contributing Writer Jaden Janak Wednesday’s special panel discussion on the use of force disparities in our city proved to be enlightening. Joining the esteemed panel of guests was Stanford Professor and MacArthur Genius Award winner Dr. Jennifer L. Eberhardt. Unlike previous comment sessions and special meetings, this meeting stayed (with a few notable exceptions)Continue reading “Having the Tough Conversations: Racial Bias and Use of Force”

Our Children Got Left Behind: Humanizing the Lives Behind Juvenile Arrest Statistics

by Contributing Writer Jaden Janak This past Wednesday evening, a hundred or so Tulsans gathered to discuss disparities in juvenile arrests uncovered in the Tulsa Equality Indicators report.  The gathering was historic. Never have City Council members, concerned citizens, and city officials (including the city’s Chief of Police) gathered to have a frank conversation aboutContinue reading “Our Children Got Left Behind: Humanizing the Lives Behind Juvenile Arrest Statistics”

Continued apathy and misinformation by those in power showcases need for community members to tell their stories

by Executive Editor Timantha Norman Tulsa’s city council held their first listening session Wednesday evening regarding the disparities in juvenile arrests and financing the Office of the Independent Monitor (OIM). The position was created in response to the Equality Indicators report, which highlighted rampant justice-oriented disparities for African-Americans in the city. Community members gathered toContinue reading “Continued apathy and misinformation by those in power showcases need for community members to tell their stories”

Who’s going to police the police? Establishing an OIM is crucial to carrying out meaningful justice in our city

by Executive Editor Timantha Norman It seems as if the vast majority of black folks who claim roots in North Tulsa have had some sort of negative experience of one sort or another with the city’s main law enforcement entity. Some of us have been able to muster up the courage to stand in ourContinue reading “Who’s going to police the police? Establishing an OIM is crucial to carrying out meaningful justice in our city”