Is This The Best This City Can Do? The City’s Responsibility To Ensure True Justice for All

by Senior Writer Britni Sharde “We don’t need a show. We need a police chief that will take servicing our community seriously,” a demand rightly expressed by North Tulsa native and executive editor of the Tulsa Star, Timantha Norman. Mayor GT Bynum has an opportunity to remove himself from his comfort zone of political expediencyContinue reading “Is This The Best This City Can Do? The City’s Responsibility To Ensure True Justice for All”

Reflections on Four Months of “Debate” on Race, Policing, and the Value of Black Lives

by Contributing Writer Mana Tahaie Author’s Note: These are my remarks from September 25th’s Tulsa City Council special meeting on racial and gender disparities in adult arrests. Opening Statement Good evening Councilors, Mayor Bynum, Chief Jordan, Ms. Doring, and Mr. O’Mellia. Before I begin, I want to acknowledge that we are on occupied land belongingContinue reading “Reflections on Four Months of “Debate” on Race, Policing, and the Value of Black Lives”

Black Pain on Display: Restoring Ourselves While Challenging Them

by Managing Editor Raynell Joseph As we wrap up the public hearings into racially biased policing in Tulsa, let’s acknowledge the great work of City Councilor Vanessa Hall-Harper, Demanding a JUSTulsa, and the organizing it took to push the Council in this direction. It was an eight month process of infuriating excuses from the CouncilContinue reading “Black Pain on Display: Restoring Ourselves While Challenging Them”

Dr. Crutcher’s Personal Journey Towards Justice and Reconciliation

by Contributing Writer Hannah Jarman When Dr. Tiffany Crutcher enters a space, the entire energy changes. Whether it’s a City Council meeting, a school board meeting, a panel discussion, canvassing in the community, or a casual discussion over coffee, she seizes the opportunity to harness its potential for change. Her passion for social change hasContinue reading “Dr. Crutcher’s Personal Journey Towards Justice and Reconciliation”

Making the OIM Matter: Why We Need To Go Back To The Drawing Board

by Contributing Writer Jaden Janak In February of this year, Mayor G.T. Bynum announced plans to create an Office of the Independent Monitor (more information about the proposed OIM ordinance can be found here) using the model currently present in Denver. This announcement came on the heels of 77 recommendations given by the Tulsa CommissionContinue reading “Making the OIM Matter: Why We Need To Go Back To The Drawing Board”

Are all cops the same? A black female officer’s perspective

by Senior Writer Britni Sharde We’ve heard the saying “Not all cops are the same!” Some of us have had respectable experiences, like being pulled over and only being given a warning or a ticket. But there are others whose experiences have triggered generational trauma. They have met their demise with a single police encounter.Continue reading “Are all cops the same? A black female officer’s perspective”

Crisis in North Tulsa: Systemic Racism and its Effect on Black Mental Health

by Contributing Writer Shalon R. Youngblood People with mental illness are often left to deteriorate until their actions provoke a police response, which has occurred all too often in Tulsa, Oklahoma. On August 24, 2018, Joshua Harvey, an unarmed black man in the midst of an active mental health crisis, was tased 25 times byContinue reading “Crisis in North Tulsa: Systemic Racism and its Effect on Black Mental Health”

Having the Tough Conversations: Racial Bias and Use of Force

by Contributing Writer Jaden Janak Wednesday’s special panel discussion on the use of force disparities in our city proved to be enlightening. Joining the esteemed panel of guests was Stanford Professor and MacArthur Genius Award winner Dr. Jennifer L. Eberhardt. Unlike previous comment sessions and special meetings, this meeting stayed (with a few notable exceptions)Continue reading “Having the Tough Conversations: Racial Bias and Use of Force”

The case for greater police accountability: The story of Chief Egunwale Amusan

by Staff Writer Deon Griggs The year was 1996 and the city of Tulsa, OK had just agreed to allow a KKK rally to take place downtown. Groups of predominantly black peaceful protesters displayed their disapproval while a patrol of police officers on horseback were sent to disperse the crowd. During the commotion of policeContinue reading “The case for greater police accountability: The story of Chief Egunwale Amusan”

Our Children Got Left Behind: Humanizing the Lives Behind Juvenile Arrest Statistics

by Contributing Writer Jaden Janak This past Wednesday evening, a hundred or so Tulsans gathered to discuss disparities in juvenile arrests uncovered in the Tulsa Equality Indicators report.  The gathering was historic. Never have City Council members, concerned citizens, and city officials (including the city’s Chief of Police) gathered to have a frank conversation aboutContinue reading “Our Children Got Left Behind: Humanizing the Lives Behind Juvenile Arrest Statistics”

Continued apathy and misinformation by those in power showcases need for community members to tell their stories

by Executive Editor Timantha Norman Tulsa’s city council held their first listening session Wednesday evening regarding the disparities in juvenile arrests and financing the Office of the Independent Monitor (OIM). The position was created in response to the Equality Indicators report, which highlighted rampant justice-oriented disparities for African-Americans in the city. Community members gathered toContinue reading “Continued apathy and misinformation by those in power showcases need for community members to tell their stories”

Who’s going to police the police? Establishing an OIM is crucial to carrying out meaningful justice in our city

by Executive Editor Timantha Norman It seems as if the vast majority of black folks who claim roots in North Tulsa have had some sort of negative experience of one sort or another with the city’s main law enforcement entity. Some of us have been able to muster up the courage to stand in ourContinue reading “Who’s going to police the police? Establishing an OIM is crucial to carrying out meaningful justice in our city”